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A controversial issue keeps cropping up in the news at the moment – press regulation and control – to protect the general public from victimisation set by the Royal Charter.

Over the last month or so, it has been a warm favourite within the headlines. It has been interesting to watch the press attack the proposed new Royal Charter which will outline the main framework for press regulation in the UK.

The charter isn’t opposing press freedom; only putting forward new steps in taking more care in preventing public offence. Press democracy shouldn’t change. But the work for journalists may have to be carefully considered and constructed…

For the whole Charter to dramatically change and have an effect the Parliament needs two thirds majority vote: making it all a lot more difficult. It would probably be easier for them to implement a new law regarding press freedom. The Charter outlines evidently that any regulator should not have the power to stop any publication of news in any format; meaning press industries can continue to publish what they like.

Journalists need and should take extra precaution when news gathering to ensure that the ethical and political platforms are abided by. Industries could be under scrutiny if politicians are enabled to have a sector of control over the conduction of news creation.

The Monarchy is responsible for the ultimate front-line.

The beauty of the Press is that they can print whatever they decide, but it will just be more monitored now by the Royal Charter. They need to enable public rights to challenge the press if they feel anything has been said that has offended them in any way.

Politicians are limited in power when it comes to control over the press. Journalists, such as myself, just need to ensure all investigations and research is conducted suitably and professionally without crossing any boundaries.

The expression of news will continue to circulate in a democratic way – just extra precautions will now be taken to give public more of a voice… when they feel the need to speak up. If the Queen decides to sign the declaration to the regulation over Press in a more critical, empowered way; then the story may be a different one.

 

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